Canadian Navy/Armed Forces
Alain Rioux from Canada have still have fond memories of the old Tracker from Summerside, PEI. This picture of the Tracker (121577) was taken at CFB Borden, Ontario on June 13th, 1993. CFB Borden was, at that time, rich with Stoof instructional airframes, this aircraft was numbered 732B.
This Tracker is the 12195 of MR880. The picture was taken at CFB Summerside, PEI on July 30th, 1987. This aircraft was painted to commemorate the 30 years of service in the CAF. Photo: Alain Rioux.
Mr. H.W. van Boeijen took this picture at the CFB Shearwater airshow in September 1983.
The 1596 is leading a four-ship formation of VS-880 CS-2F-2s. Note: The white ensign on the tail was the flag of the RCN and this is the only known colour formation shot of these aicraft with it on the tail section. The standard for all CF aircraft was the tri-color vertical bar. Photo: via Ron Beard.
An old picture of a CS-2F-1. The 'B' on the tailed marked this aircraft as part of the HMCS Bonaventures airwing. Photo: via Leon Wohlert
After the retirement of the HMCS Bonaventure the Stoof was assigned a new maritime role, MAD-boom, arrester hook and sonobouys tubes were removed. Photo: Canadian Armed Forces via J.B. Rutherford
A CS-2F-2 with the weapons bay auxiliary fuel tank installation used to extend the actieradius. Photo: Canadian Armed Forces via J.B. Rutherford
Even a Stoof needs a shower time by time. Photos: Canadian Armed Forces via J.B. Rutherford
We don't know exactly the type of ordnance under the wings but Ross Spenard (Canada) think this Tracker carried a SKAD kit. SKAD stands for Survival Kit Air Dropable. They were quite large and were shaped like a large bomb. Photo: Canadian Armed Forces via J.B. Rutherford
A CP-121 photographed during trails. This Tracker has two rocket pods (with travel caps installed) under the left wing and a photo pod mounted under the right wing (standard place for the photo pod). The rocket pods could each hold six CRV7 5.75 inch folding fin rockets. It looks like a standard issue D-8 mule with two riders in the background. Thanks to Brian Fleming, ex-Tracker Engine Technician. Photo: Canadian Armed Forces via J.B. Rutherford
This CP-121 fly a surveillance mission to monitor fishing activities and check for pollution off Canada's west coast. Photos: Canadian Armed Forces via J.B. Rutherford
Two nice pictures of a CP-121, flying over the moutianous terrain of Canada. The Canadian Trackers were not only used over the seas. Photographic flights were tasked in support of the Canadian Goverment in the Northwest Territories in July 1982. Photos: Canadian Armed Forces via J.B. Rutherford
CP-121 Tracker at London Air Show, 4 June 1988.
Tracker of MR880 at Shearwater during an airshow. Photo: Rob Schleiffert sr.
A CP-121 of MR880 in old Royal Canadian Navy colours. Photo: Rob Schleiffert sr.
This Tracker is about to land onboard the aircraftcarrier HMCS Bonaventure. Photo: Canadian National Defense via Robert St-Pierre.
A CP-121 onboard the HMCS Bonaventure just after the trap. Photo: Canadian National Defense via Robert St-Pierre.
Beautiful picture of a CP-121 in-flight. Photo: Canadian National Defense via ??.
Nice picture of the CS-2F3 1581. Notice the open weapons bay, MAD-boom fully extended and radome down. Clearly visible at the wingtip the AN/UPD-501 Passive ECM Antenna. Photo: Canadian National Defense via Robert St-Pierre.
This old photo shows the markings of the Tracker during its Canadian Navy-period. Photo: Canadian National Defense via Robert St-Pierre.
Another photo shows the Canadian Navy markings. This picture was taken by Denis Garand Spring in 1963. (Photo via Robert St-Pierre)
At Abbotsford in Canada CP-121s are being dismantled for spares for use on civilian Trackers. Photo: Peter Heeneman