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Genealogy

AD 650?-1250

"Capets" of France
(Bourgogne, Constantinopel, De Courtenay, Dreux, Hesbaye/Hesbaigne/The Haspengau, The Oberrheingau, Vermandois, The Wormsgau)

(Under construction)

For younger generations of ancestors who are descended from this family:
see page on Vermandois
see page on Lorraine
see page on Brabant
see page on Flanders
see page on De Beaugency
see page on Aquitaine
see page on Vianden
see page on Blois
see page on Bar-Mousson

Child of
Chrodobertus II of Hesbaye/the Haspengau ? (650?-?)
and Doda ? (660?-?)

(See 45, 44, 43, 42, 41, 40, 39, 38 generations back)

Lambert II, Count of Hesbaye/The Haspengau
(98 times our ancestor, blood-relationship .. %)
* 685? x Unknown + ? (before 741)

Children of
Lambert II, Count of Hesbaye/The Haspengau (685?-before 741)
and Unknown

(See 44, 43, 42, 41, 40, 39, 38, 37 generations back)

Rutpert I, Count of the Wormsgau, Hesbaye, the Oberrheingau
(98 times our ancestor, blood-relationship .. %)
* 710? x Williswint of Adalheim (730?) + ? (after 764)

Ingram of Hesbaye/The Haspengau
* 735? x Unknown + 778

Child of
Rutpert I, Count of the Wormsgau (710?-after 764)
and Williswint of Adalheim (710?-after 768)

(See 43, 42, 41, 40, 39, 38, 37, 36 generations back)

Thuringbert, Count of the Wormsgau
(98 times our ancestor, blood-relationship .. %)
* 740? x Unknown + ? (after 770)

(Not known if any other children)

Child of
Thuringbert, Count of the Wormsgau (740?-after 770)
and Unknown

(See 42, 41, 40, 39, 38, 37, 36, 35 generations back)

Rutpert II, Count of the Wormsgau
(98 times our ancestor, blood-relationship .. %)
* 765? x Theoderata + 12-7-807

(Not known if any other children)

Child of
Rutpert II, Count of the Wormsgau (765?-807)
and Theoderata (765?-?)

(See 41, 40, 39, 38, 37, 36, 35, 34 generations back)

Rutpert III, Count of the Wormsgau
(98 times our ancestor, blood-relationship .. %)
* 790? x Wiadruth (Wiltrude) of Orléans + 834

(Not known if any other children)

Child of
Rutpert III, Count of the Wormsgau (790?-834?)
and Wiadruth (Wiltrude) of Orléans (790?-?)

(See 40, 39, 38, 37, 36, 35, 34, 33 generations back)

Robert "The Strong", Count of Paris = Rutpert IV, Count of the Oberrheingau
(98 times our ancestor, blood-relationship .. %)
* 815 x Adélaïde of Tours (864?) + 15-9-866
Rutpert, who was Count of the Oberrheingau, entered the service of King Charles II "The Bald" of West-Francia in 852 to help fight the Vikings. He became Count of Paris, Count of Anjou and Blois, or Margrave of the area between the Seine and Loire rivers.

Children of
Robert "The Strong", Count of Paris = Rutpert IV, Count of the Oberrheingau (815-866)
and Adélaïde of Tours (819?-after 866)

(See 39, 38, 37, 36, 35, 34, 33, 32 generations back)

Eudes (Odo), Count of Paris, Duke of Francia, King of France
* ? + 898
Eudes was made Count of Paris in 883, which he had defended against the Vikings, and Duke of Francia in 886. He was elected King of France by the other Dukes in 888, after Emperor Charles III "The Fat" had been deposed. Eudes appointed Charles III "The Simple", a Karolingian, as his successor in 893.

Robert I, Count of Paris, Duke of Francia, King of France
(98 times our ancestor, blood-relationship .. %)
* 862? x I. Aelis of Alsace II. Béatrice of Vermandois (893) + 15-6-923 (Soissons)
Robert was elected King of France in 922 by the Dukes of France who had deposed and imprisoned Charles III "The Simple" until his death in 929. King Robert died not long after his coronation, and was succeeded in 923 by his son-in-law Rudolf (Raoul), Duke of Bourgogne.
Robert's first wife Aelis (Alix) was possibly a member of the "Etichonids" family of Alsace.
For Robert's descendants by Aelis of Alsace see below
For his descendants by Béatrice of Vermandois see below

Children of
Robert I, Count of Paris, Duke of Francia, King of France (862?-923)
and Aelis of Alsace (870?-before 893)

(See 38, 37, 36, 35, 34, 33, 32, 31 generations back)

Adèle (or Liégarde Hildebrante?) of Paris (of Neustria, of France)
(47 times our ancestor, blood-relationship 0,00000045 %)
* 887? x Héribert II, Count of Vermandois + 931?
For her descendants see the page on Vermandois.

Richilde of France
(18 times our ancestor, blood-relationship 0,00000029 %)
* 892? x I. Thibaut "The Elder", Count of Blois II. Guillaume of Périgord + ?
For her descendants by Thibaut of Blois see the page on Blois

Children of
Robert I, Count of Paris, Duke of Francia, King of France (866?-923)
and Béatrice of Vermandois (876-929)

(See 36, 35, 34, 33, 32, 31 generations back)

Emma of France
* 895 x Raoul (Rudolf), Duke of Bourgogne, King of France
Emma's husband was King from 923 until his death in 936.

Hugues "The Great", Count of Paris, Duke of Francia
(33 times our ancestor, blood-relationship .. %)
* 900 ? x Hedwig of Saxony (14-9-937) + 16-5-956
Duke Hugues' inheritance, Neustria, was taken from him by his brother-in-law Raoul (Rudolf), who had succeeded Hugues' father as King in 923. When King Raoul died in 936, Hugues inherited Bourgogne and became one of the most powerful Dukes. He did however not want to become King himself, and instead he cleverly arranged the election of a member of the Karolingian dynasty, Louis IV "d'Outremer" (also our ancestor), the son of the deposed Emperor Charles III "The Fat". Louis IV was in effect a puppet-King, while Duke Hugues had effective control.

Children of
Hugues "The Great", Count of Paris, Duke of Francia (900?-956)
and Hedwig of Saxony (920-965)

(See 35, 34, 33, 32, 31, 30 generations back)

Béatrice Capet (of Neustria, of France)
(13 times our ancestor, blood-relationship .. %)
* 938 x Frédéric I, Count of Bar, Duke of Upper-Lorraine (954) + ? (after 987)
For her descendants see the page on Lorraine

Hugues Capet, Count of Paris, Duke of Bourgogne, Duke of Francia, King of France
(20 times our ancestor, blood-relationship 0,00000064 %)
* 939 (Noyon) x Adélaïde of Poitou (Aquitaine) + 24-10-996 (Paris)
Hugues Capet, who as Duke ruled over the area around Paris, was elected the new King in 987 by a Council of nobles after his predecessor Louis V "Do Nothing", the last Karolingian King, a grandson of Louis IV, had died without heirs. The other contender was Charles "The Fat", Duke of Lower-Lorraine, who as the son of King Louis IV "d'Outremer" of France was of illustrious birth but who was thought to be incompetent in body as well as in mind, and - to make things even worse - had married Bonne of Ardennes, a girl too low in rank to be acceptable as queen, being merely the daughter of one of Charles' vassals, Godefroid "The Prisoner" of Ardennes, Count of Verdun (see the page on Lorraine). Hugues Capet, on the other hand, was already seen as the first among the Dukes. However, after his election as King of the Gauls, the Bretons, the Normans, the Aquitanians, the Goths, the Spaniards (in Navarra and Barcelona) and the Gascons, his powers remained rather limited and his vassals continued to rule their lands largely independently as they had done under the last Karolingians.

Children of
Hugues Capet, Count of Paris, Duke of Bourgogne, Duke of Francia, King of France (939-996)
and Adélaïde of Poitou (Aquitaine) (950?-1004)

(See 34, 33, 32, 31, 30, 29 generations back)

Robert II "The Pious", King of France
(12 times our ancestor, blood-relationship 0,0000010 %)
* 970 (Orleans) x I. Rozala (Suzanne) of Ivrea (of Italy) (988) II. Bertha of Bourgogne (?-11-996) III. Constance of Arles (of Provence) (1003) + 20-7-1031 (Melun)
Robert II had been carefully prepared by his father for the throne. In spite of him being known as "The Pious", he rejected his first wife Rozala and married his cousin Bertha of Bourgogne (Burgundy), and through his new wife he succeeded in establishing his authority over Bourgogne. Pope Gregorius V however excommunicated him for this, and Robert had to abandon Bertha. Rozala died in 1003, freeing Robert to marry Constance of Arles, another woman with useful connections, being the daughter of the Count of Toulouse, an area in the south which now could also be brought under his royal sphere of influence. During his reign, Robert had to fight constantly to keep his vassals under his control, and to keep the borders secure from attempt from outside to take over parts of his Kingdom.

Gisèle of France
* 974 x Hugues I of Ponthieu (994) + ? (after 1000)
For her husband's family see the page on Ponthieu.

Avoise (Hathui / Hedwige) of France
(8 times our ancestor, blood-relationship 0,00000029 %)
* 975 x Reinier IV, Count of Hainaut (996) + ? (after 1013)
For her descendants see the page on Brabant.

Adèle of France
* 990 x Renaud I of Nevers (before 1029) + 1063

Children of
Robert II "The Pious", King of France (970-1031)
and Constance of Arles (of Provence) (984-1032)

(See 30, 29, 28 generations back)

Henri I, King of France
(3 times our ancestor, blood-relationship 0,00000075 %)
* 17-5-1008 x Anna Agnesa Yaroslavna of Kiev (Reims 14-5-1051) + 4-8-1060 (Vitry-aux Loges)
King Henri was well prepared by his father Robert for taking over the throne, like Robert himself had been by his father. Henri soon lost his crown to his brother Robert, who was supported by their mother Constance and the Count of Blois. But Henri, supported by the Duke of Normandy and the Counts of Anjou and Flanders was able to reconquer his domain, but he had to cede the Kingdom of Bourgogne to his brother Robert. During his reign, Henri had to fight many wars with his powerful independent-minded vassals, especially Duke William "The Conqueror" of Normandy, the Duke of Bourgogne and the Count of Blois.
For Henri's descendants see below

Adélaïde of France
(7 times our ancestor, blood-relationship 0,0000011 %)
* 1009 x I. Richard III, Duke of Normandy (?-1-1027) II. Boudewijn V, Count of Flanders (Lille 1028) + 8-1-1079 (Messina)
For her descendants by Boudewijn V see the page on Flanders.

Robert I "The Elder", King of Bourgogne
(1 times our ancestor, blood-relationship 0,000000093 %)
* 1011 x I. Héliette de Semur (1032) II. Irmingarde of Anjou + 21-3-1076 (Fleure-sur-Ouche)
For his descendants by Irmingarde of Anjou see below

Children of
Henri I, King of France (1008-1060)
and Anna Agnesa Yaroslavna of Kiev (1036-1076)

(See 28, 27 generations back)

Philippe I, King of France
(2 times our ancestor, blood-relationship 0,0000011 %)
* 1052 x I. Bertha of Holland (1072) II. Bertrade van Montfoort (15-5-1092) + 30-7-1108 (Melun)
King Philippe I was only seven years old when his father died. The year before he had already been crowned in the presence of his father, but of course he could not yet rule himself. Count Boudewijn V of Flanders, the second husband of Philippe's aunt Adélaïde, was appointed Regent of France, together with Queen-Mother Anna and the Archbishop of Reims. In 1066, at the still tender age of 14, Philipe took over himself. He continued the policy of his predecessors to consolidate and increase the King's power over the great local lords in France. In the first year of his reign, his most powerful vassal, Duke William of Normandy won the battle of Hastings in 1066 and became King of England. Philippe allied himself with the Counts of Anjou, and Flanders who felt threatened by Duke / King William's increased might. In 1092, Philippe rejected his first wife Bertha of Holland, and abducted Bertrade van Montfoort whom he married. This of course led to him being excommunicated by Pope Urbanus II.
For Philippe's descendants by Bertha of Holland see below

Hugues of France
(1 times our ancestor, blood-relationship 0,00000037 %)
* 1057 x Adèle / Aélis / Adélaïde of Vermandois (1077) + 18-10-1102 (Tarsus)
For his descendants see below

Child of
Robert I "The Elder" of Bourgogne (1011-1076)
and Irmingarde of Anjou (1012-1076)

(See 29 generations back)

Hildegarde of Bourgogne
(1 times our ancestor, blood-relationship 0,00000019 %)
* ? x Guy-Geoffroi / Guillaume VIII of Poitiers, Duke of Aquitaine (1069) + ? (after 1104)
For her descendants see the page on Aquitaine

Children of
Philippe I, King of France (1052-1108)
and Bertha of Holland (1054-1094)

(See 27, 26 generations back)

Louis VI "The Fat", King of France
(2 times our ancestor, blood-relationship 0,0000022 %)
* 1077 x I. Lucienne de Montlhéry (1104) II. Adélaïde of Savoye (3-8-1115) + 1-8-1137 (Paris)
Following traditions in this family, Louis VI had been well prepared by his father Philipe, who had involved him in government matters from 1098 onwards. After the death of his father in 1108, Louis quickly had himself crowned to ward off possible claims to the throne by his half-brother, the son of Bertrade van Montfoort. Louis reasserted his royal powers by eliminating Thomas de Marle and other rebellious vassals in the "Île de France", the heart of Louis' domain, among whom our ancestor Enquerrand de Coucy. He managed to force a number of important fiefdoms into accepting the King's rule of law, but but he failed in Normandy and in Flanders, where Louis' loyal supporter Count Guillaume (Willem) Clito was defeated and killed in battle in 1128. But Louis was generally successful in his efforts to increase the King's authority and to enlarge his domain. A great success was the marriage Louis arranged shortly before death between his son and successor Louis VII and Aliénor / Eleanor of Poitou, heir to the Duchy of Aquitaine. This marriage did however not last.
Louis' first wife Lucienne was a member of the De Montlhéry family in our tree.
For Louis' descendants by Adélaïde of Savoye see below

Constance of France
* 1078 x Boemund I de Hautevile (Chartres 1106) + 1126

Children of
Hugues of France (1057-1102)
and Adèle / Aélis / Adélaïde of Vermandois (1062-1120)

(See 27 generations back)

Mahaut (Mathilde) of Vermandois
(1 times our ancestor, blood-relationship 0,00000074 %)
* ? (after 1077) x Raoul de Beaugency + ?
For her descendants see the page on De Beaugency

Elisabeth of Vermandois
(... times our ancestor, blood-relationship ... %)
* 1085 x I. Robert I de Beaumont-le-Roger II. Guillaume II of Varennes + 13-2-1131 (Meulan)
For her descendants by Guillaume de Varennes see the page on (Under construction)

Agnès of Vermandois
* 1089 x Boniface del Vasto de Saluces + ? (after 1130)

Children of
Louis VI "The Fat", King of France (1077-1137)
and Adélaïde of Savoye (1100-1154)

(See 26, 25 generations back)

Louis VII "The Younger", King of France
(1 times our ancestor, blood-relationship 0,0000015 %)
* 1120 x I. Aliénor / Eleanor of Poitou (Aquitaine) (Bordeaux 22-7-1137) II. Adèle of Blois-Champagne (1160) + 19-9-1180 (Paris)
Louis became involved in the great conflict between the Pope and the German Emperor over who had the right to appoint Bishops. King Louis was excommunicated by Innocentius II for his opposition to the Pope's candidate as Bishop of Langres. To have his excommunication annulled, Louis eventually had to accept the Pope's candidate and to take his side against the Emperor. He took part in the Crusade and the conquest of Antioch in 1149, after which he returned to France. During his absence, his wife wife Aliénor / Eleanor, the sole heir to Aquitaine, Poitou and other areas, had become estranged from Louis and she left him in 1152. She then married Henry II "Curtmantle" Plantagenet, Duke of Normandy, who also had inherited Anjou, Maine and Touraine and who could now also claim Aquitaine and Aliénor's other possessions. On top of this, Henry II became King of England as well in 1154. Louis forged alliances with the Pope, whom he had to support against the German Emperor, and with the Counts of Flanders and Champagne. In 1160, he married Adèle of Blois-Champagne, who became the mother of his son and successor, King Philipe II "Augustus".
For his descendants by Eleanor of Poitou see below

Robert I "The Great", Count of Dreux
(1 times our ancestor, blood-relationship 0,0000029 %)
* 1123 x I. Agnès de Garlande (1139), II. Hedwige of Salisbury (1144), III. Agnès de Baudement (1152) + 11-10-1188 (Braine-sur-Vesle)
For the descendants of Robert and Agnès of Baudement see below

Constance of France
* 1124 x Raymond V, Count of Toulouse (1154) + 1180

Pierre I of France
(1 times our ancestor, blood-relationship 0,0000015 %)
* 1126 x Elisabeth de Courtenay (after 1150) + 10-4-1183

Children of
Pierre I of France (1126-1183)
and Elisabeth de Courtenay (1135-1206)

(See 25 generations back)

Alix (Adélaïde) de Courtenay
* 1160 x Aimar II of Angoulème (after 1180) + 1218
Alix and Aimar became the parents of Isabelle of Angoulème, who's first husband was John "Lackland" Plantagenet, King of England.

Pierre II de Courtenay, "Emperor of Constantinopel"
(1 times our ancestor, blood-relationship 0,0000029 %)
* 1167 x I. Agnes de Nevers (1184) II. Yolande of Flanders (of Hainaut) (Soissons 1-7-1193) + ?-6-1217 (Epiros)
Pierre' wife Yolande became the heiress to the "Latin Empire" of Constantinopel after her brother, Emperor Hendrik had died in 1216. The title of Emperor was transferred to Pierre II de Courtenay, but before he was even able to reach Constantinopel, he was captured by one of his three rival "Emperors" (the one of Epiros) who held on to those parts of the former Byzantine Empire that did not accept the Crusader Emperors in Constantinopel. Pierre died shortly after having been taken prisoner. His widow Yolande herself ruled as Empress for a few years until her death in 1219.

Constance de Courtenay
* 1168 x Gasc de Châteaufort + ? (after 1231)

Children of
Pierre II de Courtenay, "Emperor of Constantinopel" (1167-1219)
and Yolande of Flanders (?-1219)

(See 24 generations back)

Eléonore de Courtenay
* 1208 x Philippe I of Montfort + 1230

Robert II de Courtenay, Emperor of Constantinopel
* ? + 1228
Robert succeeded his mother, Empress Yolande, in 1221 and was Emperor until his death in 1228. He was succeeded as Emperor by Jean I de Brienne, the Crusader King of Jerusalem.

Baudouin II de Courtenay, Emperor of Constantinopel
* 1218 x Marie de Brienne (19-4-1229) + 1273
Boudewijn became Emperor in 1240. His wife Marie de Brienne was the daughter of Jean I, King of Jerusalem and Emperor of Constantinopel, for her family see the page on De Brienne. Boudewijn was Emperor until 1261, when the Latin Empire at Constantinopel was brought back under Greek rule by Michael Paleologos, the "Emperor" of Nicaea.

Marguérite de Courtenay
(1 times our ancestor, blood-relationship 0,0000059 %)
* ? x Heinrich I, Count of Vianden (before 1217) + 17-7-1270
For her descendants see the page on Vianden

Children of
Louis VII "The Younger", King of France (1120-1180)
and Aliénor / Eleanor of Poitou (Aquitaine) (1122-1204)

(See 25 generations back)

Maria of France
(1 times our ancestor, blood-relationship 0,0000029 %)
* 1138 x Henri I "The Liberal", Count of Champagne + 11-3-1198
Maria and her sister Alix married Henri I and Thibaut V, who were brothers. This double marriage would have strengthened the ties between the Counts of Blois and Champagne and the King of France.
For Maria's descendants see the page on Blois

Alix of France
* 1151? x Thibaut (Theobald) V, Count of Blois + ? (after 1195)
Alix and Thibaut's daughter Margaretha of Blois first married Otto of Hohenstaufen, the son of Emperor Friedrich "Barbarossa" of Germany, and after his death Gaulthier (Walter) II of Avesnes, the brother of our ancestor Bouchard of Avesnes.

Child of
Louis VII "The Younger", King of France (1120-1180)
and Adèle (Alix) of Blois-Champagne (1140?-1206)

Philipe II "Augustus", King of France
* 21-8-1165 x Isabella of Flanders (of Hainaut) (Bapaume 28-4-1180) + 14-7-1223
The young King Philipe's marriage to Isabella of Flanders (of Hainaut) had been arranged by his mentor, Philipe of Alsace, Count of Flanders, who was Isabella's uncle. Count Philipe expected to gain France's political support, in return for which France would get the County of Vermandois as Isabella's dowry. It had belonged to the heiress Elisabeth of Vermandois, Count Philipe's late wife. This dowry was however only to be transferred to the French king after Count Philipe's death, and it was probably not really the Count's intention to transfer it at all. King Philipe also must have had his doubts about this, and he did in any case not want to wait patiently for the outcome. Instead of giving support, he soon made war on his former teacher between 1181 and 1186.
In 1188, King Philipe became the ally of Richard "The Lionhearted" of England in his rebellion against his father, King Henry, who was defeated in 1189. Soon after that, in 1190, the two kings went to the Holy Land to take part in the Third Crusade, aimed at reconquering Jerusalem which had fallen to Saladdin in 1187. Emperor Friedrich II "Barbarossa" also joined, taking the route overland, but he drowned while crossing a river. After sailing from Sicily in 1191, King Philipe soon reached the besieged Muslim-occupied city of Acre, but Richard was held up in Cyprus, which he eventually conquered, deposing its Greek Orthodox Christian ruler. King Philipe returned to France the same year. He immediately started to make deals with King Richard's treacherous and incompetent brother John "Lackland". News of this reached King Richard, who tried to get home but ended up the prisoner of Heinrich VI, Friedrich II "Barbarossa"'s son.
King Philipe could now take control over many English possessions in France, and he also kept looking for an opportunity to increase his influence in the north. When his former mentor, Count Philipe of Flanders died from the plague at the siege of Acre in 1191, he made use of the power vacuum, took control of his dowry, Vermandois, and occupied the south of Flanders as well. He was prevented from taking the north by Count Boudewijn V of Hainaut (now also of Flanders, through his wife). Count Boudewijn was informed of his predecessor's death sooner than the French king, and had not wasted any time to organise the defence of his area against the expected French attack.
King Richard "The Lionhearted" was released in 1194, went home and succeeded in reestablishing his authority in England over John, and in regaining his French possessions, defeating King Philipe at Gisors in 1198. King Richard died violently the following year, and John "Lackland" now became King of England and King Philipe's main adversary in the struggle over the English possessions in France. Philipe's great accomplisment was his victory in the battle of at Bouvines in 1214 against King John and his allies, thereby establishing French Royal authority over all former English possessions north of the Loire river, forcing the English to retreat for the next forty years. Also defeated at Bouvines was the "Welf" Otto IV of Braunschweig (Brunswick), who had been crowned Emperor by Pope Innocentius III in 1198, but who had earlier been defeated and deposed in 1212 by his rival Emperor, the "Stauf" Heinrich VI. Also on the losing side was our ancestor Count Willem I of Holland, who was taken prisoner, but who then quickly changed sides to the Franco-Staufen, and was able to continue playing a role in world politics. In 1216 Count Willem joined the army of the French Crown Prince (the future King Louis VIII) to depose King John "Lackland", which resulted in his excommunicaton by Pope Innocentius III. This was however anulled in 1219 by Innocentius' successor Honorius III.

Children of
Robert I "The Great", Count of Dreux (1123-1188)
and Agnès de Baudement (1130-after 1202)

(See 24 generations back)

Robert II, Count of Dreux
(1 times our ancestor, blood-relationship 0,0000059 %)
* 1154 x Yolanda of Coucy (1210) + 28-12-1218

Pierre of Dreux
* ? (after 1184) x Alix de Thouars + 22-6-1250

Child of
Robert II, Count of Dreux (1154-1218)
and Yolanda of Coucy (1161-1222)

(See 23 generations back)

Robert III, Count of Dreux
* ? x Aenor de St. Valéry + 15-11-1250
Robert's and Aenor's daughter Yolanda of Dreux married Hugues IV of Bourgogne; their other daughter Adélaïde of Dreux became the second wife of Raoul I de Coucy, and the mother of Thomas II de Coucy.

Philippa of Dreux
(1 times our ancestor, blood-relationship 0,000012 %)
* 1192 x Henri II, Count of Bar (1219) + 17-3-1242
For her descendants see the page on the Counts of Bar-Mousson

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